PD6662 PDF

A properly completed risk assessment will lead to an appropriately designed and graded system. When designing a confirmable alarm system, insurers expect alarm installers to take into account the need to detect intruders before they reach the target, as well as the need to have confirmation of detection. Another important aspect of the EN requirements is the concept of a security grade. This grade is described in terms of the perceived type of burglar and how determined the burglar is likely to be. This can be as simple as a sounder activating, through to the most sophisticated form of remote signalling. The equipment that is used to signal these events is also subject to the grading structure and subject to a fairly complicated set of requirements.

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A properly completed risk assessment will lead to an appropriately designed and graded system. When designing a confirmable alarm system, insurers expect alarm installers to take into account the need to detect intruders before they reach the target, as well as the need to have confirmation of detection.

Another important aspect of the EN requirements is the concept of a security grade. This grade is described in terms of the perceived type of burglar and how determined the burglar is likely to be. This can be as simple as a sounder activating, through to the most sophisticated form of remote signalling.

The equipment that is used to signal these events is also subject to the grading structure and subject to a fairly complicated set of requirements. There are varying levels of notification within a grade and these are normally denoted by a letter after the grade of the system. For example, a system may be categorised as having a grade 2B means of notification for a fairly basic method of remote communication on a fairly simple installation, or, it may be a grade 3C for a more complex method on a higher grade of installation.

It is also important to recognise that this equipment forms an integral part of the intruder alarm system. Unfortunately the overall system grade would only be a grade 2.

Grade 1 is for a low risk of theft. It applies to a property which is not likely to attract burglars. Grade 2 is for a higher risk of theft. Such a property is likely to have something of interest to an experienced thief who is likely to have some knowledge of how alarm systems work and possibly carry some tools to help him overcome a simple alarm system. The thief is likely to check the building for easy access through doors, windows and other openings, therefore these are the principle areas of detection.

Grade 3 is for a property. An intruder is likely to be knowledgeable about intruder alarm systems and may attempt to overcome the system. The thief is likely to get in by penetrating doors, windows or other openings but can also be expected to gain access by penetration of floors, walls and ceilings so additional protection is required. Grade 4 is for highest-risk properties. Such properties are likely to be targeted by a gang of thieves who will probably have planned the burglary in advance.

They will know some techniques for preventing detection or tampering with intruder alarm systems, and therefore, the levels of sophistication need to be that much greater to prevent this happening.

To a large degree the choice of grade is dictated by the insurance companies but a rule of thumb guide is as follows:. The EN standard states that an installer can use different grades of component within the same intruder system. For example, if the installation has a Grade 2 listing, it is acceptable to use a Grade 3 power supply. However, if all the components or detection devices in a system are the same grade, that system is limited to that one grade.

It is possible to have a defined part of a system at a higher grade so long as all associated parts are at the same or higher grade. For example a system combining intruder and personal attack hold-up functionality could have a grade 4 personal attack system whilst the intruder parts were limited to a grade 3.

But this example is only valid if the power supply, alarm transmission system and warning devices used by personal attack parts are all grade 4. The system as a whole is, of course, would only be grade 3. Insurers are looking to the NSI as part of their inspection programme to ensure that installers carry out Risk Assessments professionally when designing systems and selecting a Risk Assessment Grade. Therefore, CIA has worked closely with insurance companies to discuss with them the real needs of the customer and ensure the correct level of security will be installed.

In most cases, the grade of system and therefore the level of detection required by an insurer will be either a Grade 2 or a Grade 3. However, it should be noted that insurers are not only interested in the grade of the detection installed but also focus on the type of remote signalling.

The grade of remote signalling required will usually be the same grade as the rest of the alarm system. However, from experience we have also seen many insurers require much higher grades of remote signalling than the grade of intruder alarm we are installing. It is vital therefore, that all aspects of their requirements are taken into consideration before systems are designed.

In practical terms there are substantial differences between two grades. For example, when comparing grade 3 to grade 2 installations, not only are there different component parts of higher sophistication, but also there are more detection devices required to detect if intruders attempt to gain access through the fabric of the building. For this reason, before accepting any quotation for a new intruder alarm system, we would strongly recommend that the design is approved by the insurance company.

Retrospectively altering the installation — if the design is not approved — can prove to be a costly experience. CIA are NSI gold medal accredited and can carry out a full risk assessment to offer the right grade of protection for your property and completely satisfy insurance requirements. Back to the main Intruder Alarms page. The engineers were excellent, hard-working, efficient and pleasant, and did a great job.

They explained everything thoroughly. They were tidy and left the house as they found it. We always receive excellent service from CIA. Excellent explanation of system options and how to use it. Nothing was too much effort. Engineer took his time to think about the best way to overcome problems that were not apparent at the time of survey.

He made suggestions as to the best way to overcome them. Everything was done and cleaned up. Thank […]. Both the system designer and the install team were excellent.

I am really pleased with the end result. Always get good service and prices are competitive. Re-arranging appointments is easy and technicians always turn up as arranged. What are the grades? What grade of system does my installation need? What are insurers looking for? Martin Carter Clanfield, Hampshire Always get good service and prices are competitive. Ricara Ltd Brighton Always helpful, always proficient, efficient and effective.

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PD 6662:2017

PD includes the main European BS EN alarm product standards, along with system requirements from BS EN for Intrusion and hold-up systems and BS for Installation and configuration designed to generate confirmed alarm conditions. Subsequent to the publication of PD many of these standards were modified to be more closely aligned to each other. For example notification options cited in BS , including the introduction of dual and single path ATS performance categories, have been included in BS EN A key change within PD is that some of the standards referenced are no longer dated.

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Compliance Certificates PD 6662:2017

PD includes the main European BS EN alarm product standards, along with system requirements from BS EN for Intrusion and hold-up systems and BS for Installation and configuration designed to generate confirmed alarm conditions. Subsequent to the publication of PD many of these standards were modified to be more closely aligned to each other. For example notification options cited in BS , including the introduction of dual and single path ATS performance categories, have been included in BS EN A key change within PD is that some of the standards referenced are no longer dated. This ensures that PD is streamlined to call on the latest relevant edition of those standards at all times, reducing need for future updates. This is a powerful message given the value placed on the PD scheme by the Police Services in regard to alarm response. Working with NSI approved companies who issue NSI Certificates of Compliance for all alarm installations they commission, gives buyers the assurance that the latest versions of Standards are adhered to at all times.

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